How to cite Julia packages for academic purpose?

Hi, does anyone know:
How to cite Julia packages as part of a paper, master thesis or other academic purposes?

Related:

and on a specific package/ecosystem:

and

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If the package has a CITATION.bib file, you can use whatever that recommends. Otherwise you can always cite the URL, for example:

@misc{quadgk,
  title = {{QuadGK.jl}: {G}auss--{K}ronrod integration in {J}ulia},
  author = {Steven G. Johnson},
  year = {2013},
  howpublished = {\url{https://github.com/JuliaMath/QuadGK.jl}}
}
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Thanks! Ok, so let`s say I want to cite the Itertools package, I can use this link: GitHub - JuliaCollections/IterTools.jl: Common functional iterator patterns. But who are the authors, is it every contributor?

In cases where there isn’t a clearly dominant author/contributor, you could list the author as “Various authors” or maybe list the top 2-3 contributors and then put “et al.” or similar, e.g. author = {Eric Davies and Daniel C. Jones and {others}} for IterTools.jl.

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I usually look in the license text, so here it would be “Daniel Jones, Stefan Karpinski, Simon Kornblith, Kevin Squire, Jeff Bezanson, Tim Holy, Jonathan Malmaud, Eric Davies, and other contributors”

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Thanks!

On the other side, package authors that want their packages cited could be using Zenodo (that integrates with GitHub) to automatically generate a DOI number and a GitHub badge with it after each release. It would make things better.

True and a good suggestion. It is definitely room for making it easier to cite packages and in my opinion, it is important to make it easier to cite software as it is becoming a larger part of our work and this should be acknowledged.

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